Crying Tiger Beef

April 08, 2016 3 Comments

Serving Presentation Crying Tiger Beef

 This is a dish that is often served up in many different ways whether you are eating it in Thailand or overseas. This version of the Crying Tiger sauce is probably closer to the Lao style but it's certainly the way I prefer to eat it. This is a spicy dish and not for the faint hearted. I actually prefer to eat this outside of Thailand where the beef quality is generally better and I can have the steak cooked fairly rare. Rump, sirloin, ribeye all work well with this, try to get a reasonably thick cut steak as these cook better.

Ingredients for Crying Tiger

 Marinate the steak with half the contents of the pouch for several hours or overnight in a fridge.

Cook the Padron peppers with some olive oil over a high heat for about 2 minutes each side. Remove and sprinkle with some Maldon salt flakes and set aside.

Cooking Padron peppers.

Cut into the steak into manageable portions if need be and grill or fry in a ridged frying pan until done.


I like mine to be cooked quite rare (as you can see:-) and then leave it for 5 minutes for the juices to settle before carving into strips.

Carving steak for Crying Tiger beef.
Add a tablespoon or so of warm water to the remainder of the sauce and some chopped spring onions, adjust to taste with a little lime juice and serve as a dip. I like to serve it with Thai sticky rice and Padron peppers  (Waitrose or Sainsbury's)  if possible.

Serving Presentation Crying Tiger Beef
Enjoy!

Crying Tiger Sauce can also be used in the recipes below,

  

 




3 Responses

Stephen rich
Stephen rich

July 08, 2024

I ordered the crying tiger marinade, the southern Thai green curry paste and the panang curry paste, I was impressed how quickly they arrived, within 2 days, I tried the crying tiger marinade and dip the weekend and have to say it’s one of the best things I’ve eaten even in Thai restaurants, I thought it was phenomenal, perfect heat and amazing flavour, delicious, I can’t wait to try the other pastes I bought, i was so impressed i bought 3 more pastes and had them delivered to my nephew in Devon for him to try as he’s such a foodie, thanks for making such delicious ingredients i love it
———
mythaicurry replied:
Glad you are enjoying these Stephen, thanks!

Melonie Akers
Melonie Akers

July 02, 2024

I bought 2 of these, and then re read the packet… didn’t realise it was HOT HOT oh well will have to find somebody to give it to, maybe my son in law will like it 😉 hahaha
———
mythaicurry replied:
Sorry about that, but as mentioned this is a very spicy sauce!

Paul
Paul

January 16, 2018

Wow, this is the first time I’ve had a Crying Tiger dish, so can’t make any comparisons with other versions, but it’s one of the nicest things I’ve ever eaten. I made it following Nitsa’s recipe, marinated the steak overnight, served with rice, asparagus, broccoli and green beans on the side. As described, it is very spicy and I’m used to spicy food, but not so spicy that it burns your mouth for 10 minutes and masks all the flavours. If you want a less spicy dish, you could just use it as a steak marinade and omit the dipping sauce, as the steak was also very delicious without the dip. I reckon one sachet could marinate three or four small to medium sized steaks, or two large ones. I used about a third of the paste to marinate a medium sized steak, so had 2 thirds left for the dip. There was quite a lot of dip left at the end, so next time I’ll buy more steak.

A very natural, fresh tasting sauce that’s obviously been made with top quality ingredients. Highly recommended if you like something spicy and tangy.

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Recipe Blog

Prik Naam Pla, Thai dipping sauce.
Prik Naam Pla, Thai dipping sauce.

July 01, 2023 2 Comments

This is the essential Thai dipping sauce you see all over Thailand. An absolute must for the Pad Kaprow recipe but also used to spice up almost any dish, particularly grilled meats or similar. And for many Thais they can't think of eating a fried egg without some Prik Naam Pla to top it. More than anything, it sums up the Thai food tastes of sour sweet and salty. Spicy? Of course that also depends on what chillies you use for this, and if you're prepared to do the extra work of separating out...

Continue Reading

Pad Kaprow or Thai Basil Beef Stir-fry
Pad Kaprow or Thai Basil Beef Stir-fry

June 15, 2023 1 Comment

Probably one of Thailand's most famous dishes served on both humble street food stalls and the poshest of restaurants. This is a simple dish with simple ingredients and with little practice, a good restaurant standard meal can be made in minutes. In Thailand this is almost always served with a crispy fried egg with a runny yolk, and the technique for cooking the egg is a crucial part of making this dish. If a crispy fried egg is not your thing of course you can eat it without, says she sadly..

Continue Reading

Thai Curry Pie
Thai Curry Pie

April 15, 2023

My first confession is that that I never thought I would be sitting here writing a recipe for a Thai Curry pie, but times change and we change with them or stagnate. My interest was sparked on my first trip back to Bangkok after the pandemic, chicken curry puffs have long been a popular Thai snack but savoury pies, usually steak and kidney, were very much something that was restricted to the Bangkok expat pub scene. All that had changed, bake shops were springing up outside the traditional to...

Continue Reading

3117
Verified Reviews